Forfeited drug SUV gets new wrap sheet to fight gangs

0
209

THE Province is providing a forfeited vehicle to the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit – British Columbia (CFSEU-BC) to help them get the message across to youth that being involved in crime and gangs can hurt your loved ones, land you in jail, and shorten your life.

B.C.’s Civil Forfeiture Office has provided a 2009 BMW X5 Sport Utility Vehicle, which was used to traffic illegal drugs in its previous life, to the CFSEU-BC, an integrated team focused on combating gangs and organized crime. The vehicle is was unveiled on Thursday night at Rogers Arena prior to a Vancouver Canucks game.

The SUV, which has been wrapped with a “skin” of graphics and messaging, will be used for the next two years as a rolling billboard to engage the public at local schools and community events and help draw people into important conversations with officers. The powerful messaging on the vehicle proclaims “End gang life” and ties in with the CFSEU-BC’s new, high-profile campaign unveiled last month.

Following up on a commitment made last year, access to the vehicle was made possible through the government’s successful civil forfeiture program which continues to undermine the profit motive behind unlawful activity by taking away the tools and proceeds of crime.

Attorney General and Minister of Justice Suzanne Anton said: “This eye-catching vehicle will serve as a valuable tool to bring young people into contact with CFSEU-BC officers. Ensuring those at risk of involvement are aware of the dangers and helping them to build positive connections in their lives are critical to combating gangs and organized crime. When young people feel linked to their families, communities, schools, job prospects and opportunities to succeed in life, they’re that much more resistant to a life of crime.”

Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit-British Columbia Chief Superintendent Dan Malo said: “This vehicle’s history and bold graphics will help the CFSEU-BC engage youth and citizens in communities across British Columbia in our collective public education and gang prevention efforts to end gang life in our province. Gang life does not pay, and when you get involved with gangs you risk everything including your property, your life and even the lives of those closest to you.”