Election 2015 – the Long Slog to October 19

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Constituency office for Newton-North Delta located on Scott Road, between the two communities of Surrey and Delta. Used by two MP’s, it will not be practical as that riding is now two: Surrey Newton and Delta. Photo: Ray Hudson

by Ray Hudson

Constituency office for Newton-North Delta located on Scott Road, between the two communities of Surrey and Delta. Used by two MP’s, it will not be practical as that riding is now two: Surrey Newton and Delta.  Photo: Ray Hudson
Constituency office for Newton-North Delta located on Scott Road, between the two communities of Surrey and Delta. Used by two MP’s, it will not be practical as that riding is now two: Surrey Newton and Delta.
Photo: Ray Hudson

Surrey: As the race announcer says, “They’re off!” But it’s going to be less a race than an endurance contest for both candidates and electors. At the time of writing in August, this election campaign will be 75 days by the time the polls close on October 19. The longest campaign, 140 years ago, was conducted in a different time and in a different manner than modern times so really isn’t comparable. So take a last fond look at any well-kept corners in your community, they’ll soon be over-run by election signs until well into the fall.

Sign free intersectionAs far as your member of parliament is concerned, as of last Sunday, a sign on the window of a constituency office reads (in part) “Members of Parliament no longer have the status of MP. They are now candidates.”

The Asian Journal will be providing coverage of this marathon by focusing first, on candidate profiles of key major Lower Mainland ridings, specific issues of local concern to these ridings, while the major media sources cover the big picture at the national level.

We’re a growing country and that is reflected in the size of the parliament, 308 seats at dissolution there are now thirty more ridings requiring 30 additional desks in the House of Commons when the dust settles in the fall.

BC has six additional ridings, along with a number of ridings, which have been re-arranged to balance the increase in population across the region.

In the south Fraser riding boundaries have been redrawn, including:

Delta–Richmond East: was all but Richmond centre, and Delta with Ladner and Tsawwassen, excluding North Delta. The Richmond side is now Steveston-Richmond East, while south of the Fraser, Delta is once again one constituency. Richmond Centre remains virtually unchanged.

Newton-North Delta: was all of North Delta and Newton as far as King George Blvd. North Delta goes back into the Delta boundary while Newton is relabeled Surrey-Newton bounded by 120th Street to the West, #10 Highway to the South, east to 144th Street and north to 88th Avenue.

Surrey North is renamed Surrey Centre and is bound by the river to the north, Delta in the west, 88th Ave in the south and 148th then 152nd Streets in the East against Fleetwood-Port Kells which, relatively unchanged has been reduced in area slightly.

South Surrey-White Rock-Cloverdale: has been significantly changed and more focused on the area of South Surrey-White Rock, now describe as Number 10 Highway to the north and 196th Avenue to the east. They lose Cloverdale on the north side of #10 Highway.

Cloverdale-Langley City: the new riding from number 10 Highway in the south, 144th in the west, north from 68th Ave. along the Serpentine to 88th Ave. in the north, 200th Street and Langley city in the east.

Langley: now becomes Langley-Aldergrove (minus Langley City) with the eastern boundary pushed east to Bradner Road in the north (of Fraser Highway) and Mt. Lehman Road south of Fraser Hwy to the border.

Vancouver South: which ran from Granville to Boundary road now extends west only to Cambie Street where it butts up against the new riding of Vancouver-Granville which runs west to Arbutus and north to 4th and 6th Avenues.

Ridings of Particular Interest:

South Surrey-White Rock: former Surrey Mayor Dianne Watts will contest the riding for the Conservatives against former White Rock councillor, Joy Davies and environmental lawyer, Pixie Hobby for the NDP.

Fleetwood-Port Kells: Incumbent (since 2004) Conservative Nina Grewal will be challenged by recently retired RCMP Inspector, Garry Begg for the NDP and former TransLink Spokesperson, Ken Hardie for the Liberals.

Surrey-Newton: NDP Incumbent Jinny Simms will vie with former Liberal MP Sukh Dhaliwal and Joy TV Broadcaster Harpreet Singh for the Conservatives for the riding.

Vancouver-South: Incumbent Conservative, Wai Young, will be challenged by retired Lt. Col Harjit Singh Sajjan, and NDP candidate Amandeep Nijjar who works in the finance department of COPE 378.

Delta: Conservative Incumbent (South Delta) and former Minister of National Revenue, Kerry-Lynne Findlay is opposed by political newcomer and described Canadian health expert, Jeremy Levesque for the NDP and Liberal, Carla Qualtrough, a Ladner lawyer and human rights advocate, who was a candidate for School Board in the last municipal election.

Cloverdale-Langely City: This new riding is being contested by, Liberal John Aldag, an Historic Sites manager with Parks Canada and Scott Anderson, a small business owner represents the Green Party, Conservative Dean Drysdale, a Kwantlen Professor of Business Management and Rebecca Smith, a Consultant for the NDP.

Surrey Central: Renamed from Surrey North, NDP Incumbent Jasbir Sandhu will be challenged by Conservative businessman, Sucha Thind. Liberals have not declared yet.

Here are the parties: According to Elections Canada there are 18 registered parties going forward. Along with the mainstream parties, the list includes the Animal Alliance Environment Voters Party of Canada; Party for Accountability, Competency and Transparency; Pirate Party; the Rhinoceros Party and the Bridge Party of Canada.

Stay in touch with the Asian Journal for critical coverage of the people and events on the ground, in the ridings of the Lower Mainland as the federal campaign unfolds.