Crohn’s and Colitis Canada grants fund promising Canadian research

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Toronto: Crohn’s and Colitis Canada has invested $3.4 million this year to support innovative research on Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, debilitating chronic diseases that affect more than 233,000 Canadians.

These grants will support 9 promising research projects across Canada. This diverse research will explore genetic and environmental causes of the diseases, improve our understanding (and potential treatment) of symptoms and consider innovations to improve patient care and quality of life.

Crohn’s and Colitis Canada funds progressive and innovative projects that bring together the finest scientific minds to find new approaches and treatments for Crohn’s and colitis, known collectively as inflammatory bowel disease. Their highly competitive granting process assigns funding applications to an independent peer review panel of scientific experts and lay reviewers, evaluating applications on scientific merit, relevancy and potential impact for Crohn’s and colitis patients. “The Grant Review Committee is dedicated to selecting excellent research that also addresses the needs of both patients and the Crohn’s and colitis community as a whole” says Marla Rosen, a Grant Review Committee lay member and the mother of a child with Crohn’s.

The incidence of Crohn’s and colitis has been rising, particularly since 2001, and significantly so in children under the age of 10. Canada has among the highest reported prevalence (number of people) and incidence (number of new cases per year) of these diseases in the world. Crohn’s and colitis are lifelong diseases that can result in pain, urgent bathroom visits, hospital stays, and multiple surgeries. They can affect academic success, careers, and relationships.

“Crohn’s and Colitis Canada is proud to fund and inspire the most promising research” says Lindee David, Chief Executive Officer at Crohn’s and Colitis Canada. “Our research investments are improving the lives of people affected by Crohn’s and colitis, moving us forward to ultimately finding cures.”