Cops for Cancer ready to ride

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Assistant Commissioner and Lower Mainland District Commander Bill Fordy wishes RCMP members a safe ride as they head out on the first day of their 800 kilometre Cops for Cancer Tour de Coast ride from Maple Ridge to Pemberton with many stops in between.
Assistant Commissioner and Lower Mainland District Commander Bill Fordy wishes RCMP members a safe ride as they head out on the first day of their 800 kilometre Cops for Cancer Tour de Coast ride from Maple Ridge to Pemberton with many stops in between.
Assistant Commissioner and Lower Mainland District Commander Bill Fordy wishes RCMP members a safe ride as they head out on the first day of their 800 kilometre Cops for Cancer Tour de Coast ride from Maple Ridge to Pemberton with many stops in between.

Vancouver: September marks the start of Cops for Cancer rides throughout British Columbia.
In Greater Vancouver and the Fraser Valley nearly two dozen RCMP members will join fellow riders from law enforcement and emergency service agencies throughout the region on a grueling nine-day ride covering 800 kilometres.
Whether our employees are police officers or working behind the scenes, we all got into this field because we want to help others. I know it’s a big commitment of their personal time, but ultimately, what a privilege to be able to volunteer for Cops for Cancer, raising money for such a great cause, says Lower Mainland District Commander Assistant Commissioner Bill Fordy.
Tour de Coast starts today, September 21-29, and will take riders from Maple Ridge to Pemberton. The Tour de Valley begins September 22-30 and will take riders on an 800 km trek north from Langley to Boston Bar, then south to Tsawwassen and White Rock.
Like most other people out there I have had my life touched by cancer, both in my family and personal life, with a close friend in a terminal battle right now, says Whistler RCMP Sergeant Rob Knapton whos riding in the Tour de Coast. I know it will be a long week and a hard ride, but my effort is nothing compared to the challenges that kids with cancer have to endure.
Fellow rider Sgt. Tess Landry with the Burnaby RCMP lost an aunt this summer to cancer. Since I started training for the ride, Ive learned that a co-worker’s daughter had cancer and attended Camp Goodtimes and was now cancer free. Another two co-workers advised they were survivors of childhood cancer and they wanted to donate. This experience has opened my eyes to how many people are affected by cancer and survived. If I can have any part in helping another child reach adulthood, cancer free, I’m all in. Suffering on a bike in the rain and heat is the least I can do, says Sgt. Landry.
Cops for Cancer tours support the Canadian Cancer Society and police officers raise money to participate in the ride. Donations go to leading pediatric cancer research that develops treatments and furthers research into childhood cancers. Donations also go to support Camp Goodtimes, which supports families living with cancer.